OK

OK
1.
adj., adv., n., & v. (also okay) colloq.
—adj. (often as int. expressing agreement or acquiescence) all right; satisfactory.
—adv. well, satisfactorily (that worked out OK).
—n. (pl. OKs) approval, sanction.
—v.tr. (OK's, OK'd, OK'ing) give an OK to; approve, sanction.
Etymology: orig. US: prob. abbr. of orl (or oll) korrect, joc. form of 'all correct'
2.
abbr. US Oklahoma (in official postal use).

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OK [OK OKs OKed OKing] (also okay) exclamation, adjective, adverb, noun, verb [əʊˈkeɪ] [oʊˈkeɪ]

‘Shall we go for a walk?’ ‘OK.’

2. used to attract sb's attention or to introduce a comment

Okay, let's go.

3. used to check that sb agrees with you or understands you

The meeting's at 2, OK?

I'll do it my way, OK?

4. used to stop people arguing with you or criticizing you

OK, so I was wrong. I'm sorry.

 
Word Origin:
mid 19th cent. (originally US): probably an abbreviation of orl korrect, humorous form of all correct, popularized as a slogan during President Van Buren's re-election campaign of 1840 in the US; his nickname Old Kinderhook (derived from his birthplace) provided the initials.
 
adjective, adverb (informal)
1. safe and well; in a calm or happy state

Are you OK?

2. \OK (for sb) (to do sth) all right; acceptable; in an acceptable way

Is it OK if I leave now?

Is it OK for me to come too?

Does my hair look okay?

I think I did OK in the exam.

Whatever you decide, it's

okay by me

.

an okay movie

 
Word Origin:
mid 19th cent. (originally US): probably an abbreviation of orl korrect, humorous form of all correct, popularized as a slogan during President Van Buren's re-election campaign of 1840 in the US; his nickname Old Kinderhook (derived from his birthplace) provided the initials.  
Synonyms:
all right OK fine healthy strong fit
These words all describe sb who is not ill and is in good health.
well [not usually before noun] (rather informal) in good health:

I'm not feeling very well.

Is he well enough to travel?

Well is used especially to talk about your own health, to ask sb about their health or to make a comment on it.
all right [not before noun] (rather informal) not feeling ill; not injured:

Are you feeling all right?

OK [not before noun] (informal) not feeling ill; not injured:

She says she's OK now, and will be back at work tomorrow.

all right or ok?
These words are slightly less positive than the other words in this group. They are both used in spoken English to talk about not actually being ill or injured, rather than being positively in good health. Both are rather informal but OK is slightly more informal than all right.
fine [not before noun] (not used in negative statements) (rather informal) completely well:

‘How are you?’ ‘Fine, thanks.’

Fine is used especially to talk about your health, especially when sb asks you how you are. It is also used to talk about sb's health when you are talking to sb else. Unlike well it is not often used to ask sb about their health or make a comment on it: Are you keeping fine?
healthy in good health and not likely to become ill:

Keep healthy by exercising regularly.

strong in good health and not suffering from an illness:

After a few weeks she was feeling stronger.

Strong is often used to talk about becoming healthy again after an illness.
fit (especially BrE) in good physical health, especially because you take regular physical exercise:

I go swimming every day in order to keep fit.

all right/OK/fit for sth
all right/OK/fit to do sth
to feel/look well/all right/OK/fine/healthy/strong/fit
to keep (sb) well/healthy/fit
perfectly well/all right/OK/fine/healthy/fit
physically well/healthy/strong/fit
 
Example Bank:

I hope the meeting goes OK.

I'm perfectly OK now, thanks.

Is it OK with you if I come around six?

John has suggested meeting at six, and that's OK by me.

He should be OK for the game on Saturday.

I think we should be OK here for the night.

She looks OK to me.

She says she's OK now, and will be back at work tomorrow.

She worries too much— I'll be perfectly OK.

Write and let me know you're OK.

Did they get there OK?

 
permission
Syn: go ahead

I'm still waiting for the boss to give me the OK.

 
Word Origin:
mid 19th cent. (originally US): probably an abbreviation of orl korrect, humorous form of all correct, popularized as a slogan during President Van Buren's re-election campaign of 1840 in the US; his nickname Old Kinderhook (derived from his birthplace) provided the initials.  
Example Bank:

Mum's given me the OK to go out.

The building plans finally got the OK.

I'm still waiting for them to give me the OK.

We have to wait until we get the OK.

 
verb (OK's, OK'ing, OK'd, OK'd)\OK sth (informal)
to officially agree to sth or allow it to happen

She filled in an expenses claim and her manager OK'd it.

Verb forms:  
Word Origin:
mid 19th cent. (originally US): probably an abbreviation of orl korrect, humorous form of all correct, popularized as a slogan during President Van Buren's re-election campaign of 1840 in the US; his nickname Old Kinderhook (derived from his birthplace) provided the initials.  
Example Bank:

The President OK'd the execution of the man.

The Senate Committee has OK'd the bill.

The chairman OK'd the request.

The property has to be valued before a mortgage loan is OK'd.

 
Syn: approve

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ok
var. ac Obs.; obs. f. eke, oak; obs. pa. tense of ache.

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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